Battle of Pea Ridge Anniversary Sets Record Amount of Visitors

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Park Rangers say 21,000 people came for the anniversary. It's a record for the military park with people from all over the country.

Civil war cavalry soldier Seth Mangas said the rain didn't force him off the battlefield at Pea ridge but it did cancel the morning program.

"So far today we haven't really done anything because it's been sogged out. This is the first chance we've really had to get Ranger saddled to get all of our gear out and start firing," said Mangas.

Mangas said a horse is a soldier's lifeline so when it poured, Ranger's safety was first.

"Horses tend to slip and you can twist an ankle on a horse you can end up hurting yourself when the horse falls on you," said Mangas.

Re-enactors transported visitors back in history. Mangas said he enjoys teaching about those who fought and lost their lives where he stands.

"Getting out there and actually doing and experiencing what goes along with it," said Mangas.

Park Rangers say 21,000 people came for the anniversary. It's a record for the military park with people from all over the country.

Greg Frank made the 25 hour drive from New York to see the 150th Anniversary.

"I just love all of the facts that happened here. That's why I said Dad we've got to get out there," said Frank.

He said he's glad the rain held out until the last day.

"It feels like I'm an actual soldier standing here except instead of being in frigid cold, I'm wet but you know it doesn't really matter , what matters is that I'm here living it up," said Frank.

Mangas said rain, sleet, nor snow would've forced soldiers in the bitter winter of 1862 to surrender.

"If you come under fire, didn't matter if it was raining or what you had to return fire or you would be one of the casualties laying on the ground," said Mangas.