Six Convicted Meth Dealers Receive Sentences In Northwest Arkansas

meth

Six convicted drug traffickers were sentenced to a total of over 79 years in prison, according to a news release from Conner Eldridge, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Arkansas.

The six individuals were originally charged in a 7-count indictment filed on July 31, 2013. Judge Timothy L. Brooks presided over the sentencings in U.S. District Court in Fayetteville, the release states.

Documents filed in the case state that the Drug Enforcement Administration in Fort Smith began investigating a drug trafficking organization responsible for the distribution of methamphetamine in Washington and Sebastian counties. During the investigation, the six drug traffickers charged in the case were identified.

On June 18, 2013, at the request of the DEA, a source placed an order with the suspects for two pounds of meth to be delivered in Washington County. One of the suspects said they’d place the meth inside of a laundry detergent box. On June 20, 2013, DEA agents located the vehicle delivering the meth, and it was stopped. The driver consented to a search of the vehicle, and a laundry detergent box containing the meth was found, the release states.

The following individuals were convicted of being apart of the meth-dealing organization:

  • Ivan Jiminez, 27, of Mexico, was sentenced to 292 months in prison without the possibility of parole. He was found to be the leader of the organization.
  • Rebecca Cason, 25, of Fort Smith, was sentenced to 240 months in prison without the possibility of parole.
  • Jacinto Frias-Gonzales, 32, of Mexico, was sentenced to 206 months in prison without the possibility of parole.
  • Victoria Ramos, 27, of Fort Smith, was sentenced to 96 months in prison without the possibility of parole.
  • Miguel Landeros-Estrada, 34, of Mexico was sentenced to 78 months in prison without the possibility of parole.
  • Flor Ramirez, 25, of Mexico was sentenced to 37 months in prison without the possibility of parole.

U. S. Attorney Eldridge commented, “The importance of ridding our communities of large-scale drug-trafficking cannot be overstated.  These defendants now face significant prison time for bringing methamphetamine and crime into our communities.  We must do all that we can to protect our children from the crime and violence that are part and parcel to this type of illegal activity.”

“Through unprecedented partnerships with local enforcement, we are making major progress in preventing meth trafficking from taking hold in our community. This investigation is a compelling example of that success,” said DEA Acting Assistant Special Agent in Charge Mike Davis.

 

11 comments

  • Janet

    Protect our borders, keep the drug dealing foreigners out of our country and this crud wont happen as much.

  • greg

    The reason why their here is because there is a demand for it. If Americans wasn’t so dependant on drugs you wouldn’t see so many people trying to make it and import here. I gaurantee you there are plenty of white people in prison now for manufacturing meth. To be honest I think the prison sentences are too stiff. You can murder someone and get less time.

    • Arnold Fudpucker

      That doesn’t excuse the fact that these vermin, or most of them, are here illegally.That’s one of the problems with you libs. You think by pointing blame to someone else clears you of any blame or excuses you of your error. That type on thinking begs for a mental evaluation.

  • BRIAN NALLEY

    I WAS RECENTLY RELEASED FROM FEDERAL PRISON IN FORREST CITY ARKANSAS, WHERE I COMPLETED A SENTENCE OF 156 MONTHS. I WAS DEALING METH AND GOT CAUGHT. I DIDNT SELL TO KIDS OR INTRODUCE IT TO ANYONE WHO HAD NEVER TRIED IT. I ALSO NEVER DEALT TO ANY JUNKIES. MOST HAD JOBS, LIKE A LAWYER AND A FARMER WHO OWNED OVER 6,000 ACRES OF LAND. I PAID MY DEBT BUT I HONESTLY THINK THAT I WAS GIVEN A SHIT DEAL BECAUSE WHILE INCARCERATED I SAW CHILD MOLESTERS AND RAPISTS COME IN WITH LESS TIME THAN ME AND GET OUT AND REOFFEND AND BE BACK BEFORE I LEFT. SO WHAT DO YOU THINK THE SENTENCES ARE SO STIFF? ITS ABOUT MONEY. IF THE PRISON SYSTEM DID’NT HAVE INMATES THERE WOULD BE A SERIOUS DEFECIT. ANY DRUG CAN MAKE SOMEONE STEAL OR COMMIT CRIMES TO GET MORE IF THEY WERE ALREADY WEAK IN THEIR MIND AND DID’NT HAVE CONTROL OVER THEIR LIFE.

    • Sarah 1

      Thankful Mr.Nalley you have been released. Please do your best to get a good job and never go back to drugs. I do believe you about the drugs for the ‘important’ citizens. Good lawyers and wallets loaded with cash do make a difference in a court case and it should not.
      My best to you as you rebuild your life.

  • Arnold Fudpucker

    @CH
    Try reading the article again. When they state that Criminal Creep, 26, “OF MEXICO”, that means they are not from this country. Now do you want to debate if they are here legally? I mean they are fine upstanding citizens and all. Deport the scum.

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