Six Convicted Meth Dealers Receive Sentences In Northwest Arkansas

meth

Six convicted drug traffickers were sentenced to a total of over 79 years in prison, according to a news release from Conner Eldridge, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Arkansas.

The six individuals were originally charged in a 7-count indictment filed on July 31, 2013. Judge Timothy L. Brooks presided over the sentencings in U.S. District Court in Fayetteville, the release states.

Documents filed in the case state that the Drug Enforcement Administration in Fort Smith began investigating a drug trafficking organization responsible for the distribution of methamphetamine in Washington and Sebastian counties. During the investigation, the six drug traffickers charged in the case were identified.

On June 18, 2013, at the request of the DEA, a source placed an order with the suspects for two pounds of meth to be delivered in Washington County. One of the suspects said they’d place the meth inside of a laundry detergent box. On June 20, 2013, DEA agents located the vehicle delivering the meth, and it was stopped. The driver consented to a search of the vehicle, and a laundry detergent box containing the meth was found, the release states.

The following individuals were convicted of being apart of the meth-dealing organization:

  • Ivan Jiminez, 27, of Mexico, was sentenced to 292 months in prison without the possibility of parole. He was found to be the leader of the organization.
  • Rebecca Cason, 25, of Fort Smith, was sentenced to 240 months in prison without the possibility of parole.
  • Jacinto Frias-Gonzales, 32, of Mexico, was sentenced to 206 months in prison without the possibility of parole.
  • Victoria Ramos, 27, of Fort Smith, was sentenced to 96 months in prison without the possibility of parole.
  • Miguel Landeros-Estrada, 34, of Mexico was sentenced to 78 months in prison without the possibility of parole.
  • Flor Ramirez, 25, of Mexico was sentenced to 37 months in prison without the possibility of parole.

U. S. Attorney Eldridge commented, “The importance of ridding our communities of large-scale drug-trafficking cannot be overstated.  These defendants now face significant prison time for bringing methamphetamine and crime into our communities.  We must do all that we can to protect our children from the crime and violence that are part and parcel to this type of illegal activity.”

“Through unprecedented partnerships with local enforcement, we are making major progress in preventing meth trafficking from taking hold in our community. This investigation is a compelling example of that success,” said DEA Acting Assistant Special Agent in Charge Mike Davis.

 



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