Doctor Files Lawsuit Against Barling Police Department

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

BARLING (KFSM) -- A doctor who had his medical license suspended after he was arrested by Barling police in November 2014 is suing the department.

David Furr was arrested Nov. 19, 2014 after police said they found two loaded pistols and loose prescriptions pills in his vehicle during a traffic stop. He was jailed on suspicion of four counts of possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of misbranded drugs and simultaneous possession of drugs and firearms, according to investigators. Those charges were later dropped.

The Arkansas Medical Board suspended Furr's medical license and he voluntarily suspended his prescribing license in Oklahoma after he was approached by the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics. At time Furr was listed as a physician for Image Quest Medical Clinic, which has locations in Roland, Oklahoma and Springdale.

A search of the Arkansas Medical Board website shows Furr's medical license is now active and expires Oct. 31, 2016.

In the lawsuit filed against the police department on Nov. 19, 2015, Furr claims his arrest was the result of a custody battle with his ex-wife.

Furr claims his ex-wife had told two Barling officers, Jerry Foley and Keith Lindley, that Furr would write prescriptions to patients at his medical clinic and they would give him back the drugs for him to sell, according to the lawsuit. None of those allegations were substantiated, the lawsuit states.

Furr's ex-wife later accused him of domestic battery and was brought to the prosecuting attorney's office by Officer Foley to make the complaint, according to the lawsuit. Furr was found not guilty in a subsequent trail, the lawsuit states.

During the course of the investigation, Officer Lindley and Furr's ex-wife entered into a romantic relationship, which is corroborated by more than 3,000 text messages, according to the lawsuit.

When Furr was booked on suspicion of possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of misbranded drugs and simultaneous possession of drugs and firearms he was wanted on a warrant for the domestic battery charge, the lawsuit states.

The lawsuit claims the officers failed to investigate, made a false arrest and prosecuted him with malice. Furr is seeking damages for mental anguish, financial and economic losses, punitive damages and costs and attorney fees.

Barling Police Chief Darrell Miner said he can't comment on a pending lawsuit or whether the allegations made against the officers in the lawsuit are being investigated.

4 comments

Comments are closed.