NYPD: Tannerite May Have Been Used In Explosive Device

SPRINGDALE (KFSM) -- After an explosion sent dozens to the hospital in New York City Saturday (Sept. 17), investigators have developed a better idea of what the bombing suspect used to carry out the attack.

According to police and anti-terrorism authorities, bombing suspect Ahmad Khan Rahami may have used a shooting target chemical in order to attack his victims.

Authorities said Rahami may have used the product Tannerite in his pressure cooker explosives. Tannerite is a binary explosive which is sold at local gun shops across the country.

"It is strictly a novelty for people," said Tim Weigel, manager of Ozark Armory. "[Consumers] will take it, they will put it in their targets, and they will blow their targets up."

Weigel said two chemicals, ammonium nitrate and aluminum powder, come in every Tannerite package.

"You have to mix them together to get it to ignite," Weigel said.

Used for long distance shooting practice, Tannerite explodes when hit by certain high-velocity bullets.

"[The product] has to be shot with a high velocity rifle. So, about 2,000 feet per second or more," Weigel said. "So, it is nothing you can mix up, throw it out the car window, and it [explodes]."

The maker of Tannerite posted this statement onĀ its Facebook page in response to reports that the product was used by Rahami: "Our product can only be set off by a successful high-power rifle shot directly to the target; and in addition to that, once done it vaporizes as it is an endothermic product."

Rahami was arrested Monday (Sept. 19) morning after a shootout with law enforcement.

2 comments

  • Treaded

    Makes no sense so I want to see the FBI analysis (and as journos you should too). The original report stated the explosive used was a homemade version of HMDT which makes a LOT more sense. Tannerite is a much lower yield and slower expanding explosive and frankly way too difficult to ignite in an IED. HMDT makes more sense, but hey, whatever fits the narrative, and doesn’t waste a good crisis, right?

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