Guns in the Spotlight after Colorado Shooting

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Firearms are in the minds of many in the aftermath of the Colorado shooting. Local gun store owners said the shooting hasn't slowed down sales.

“It hasn’t been noticeable,” said Phil Ezell, owner of Ozark Sportsman’s Supply in Tontitown.

“We are sad that happened,” Ezell said.

Steve Sturm, owner of Sturm’s Gun and Pistol Range in Springdale, said he hasn’t seen a decrease either.

"It always affects it somehow. Like I said I haven't noticed… but it may still be too soon," Steve Sturm said.

These types of incidents make some gun owners afraid government will enforce extra gun laws and prevent the sales of certain weapons and ammunition.

"Anytime something like this happens the anti-gun people start talking (and) that makes the pro-gun people think they need to buy something to make up for it," Sturm said.

Some gun owners said they agree with most of Arkansas gun regulations and how it could prevent a shooting from happening in the state.

"I wish we had a little bit more open concealed carry you know considering Colorado where they weren't allowed to actually carry inside the theatre,” James Laney, gun owner for 15 years, said.

Victor Lindley, gun owner for 50 years, said, "the concealed carry license that's available for gun owners, if people would utilize it very possibly that would have eliminated or corrected some of the problems in Colorado." 

Sturm said they don't keep record of specific sales and there isn't a limit to how many guns and how much ammunition people can buy.

"If you have handguns there are multiple sale forms that we do send to the government to tell that you bought more than one handgun in a five day period but a lot of guns no, ammunition no," Sturm said.

According to state law, before you can buy a firearm you have to complete a background check.