Museum in Lincoln Honors Arkansas Country Doctors

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Not far off the downtown Lincoln square, you'll find the Arkansas Country Doctor Museum.

It's meant to honor the doctors and nurses who kept our region healthy back in the day.

Dr. Mitch Singleton is a volunteer and historian for the museum.

"The Lincoln clinic was established in 1936 by Dr. Bing. This was the only facility in the region. He made a lot of house calls. He had a home and office together. He later added two rooms for men and two for women and a surgery suite," said Singleton.

Doctor Boyer took over the practice in 1946 and practiced here through the 1970s.

Boyer and his wife had the home on one side of the property and the medical facilities on the other.

His office looks just like it did when he retired.

Eventually a board was formed to honor not only Doctor Boyer, but all of the doctors and nurses who blazed a medical trail in the state of Arkansas.

Roy Horn is the president of the museum foundation.

"In our museum we have our surgery room and our Hall of Honor. We have the living quarters of the Boyer family. The hours of operation were established as Wednesday through Saturday from one to four," said Horn.

You'll be amazed at all of the old equipment, including the iron lung machine where a young woman with polio spent almost her entire life.

You'll also see the dental set-up where doctors would pull a tooth for just 50 cents.

"Doctor Boyer practiced here the longest. His son endowed it with a legacy to honor Arkansas Country Doctors and particularly his father," said Singleton.

The museum honors many other doctors and nurses.

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