Poteau Man Gets 55 Years In Child Porn Case

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A Poteau, Okla., man who pleaded no contest to molesting children and owning thousands of pieces of child pornography at his business will spend at least the next four decades behind bars.

Marty Hester was sentenced Wednesday to spend 55 years in prison on molestation and child pornography charges. Hester, 52, may be eligible for parole in 38 years, said Margaret Nicholson, LeFlore County assistant district attorney.

Hester received a 25-year sentence for molestation of a child under 12 years old. Twenty years of his sentence are from the charge of molestation of a child under 16 years old. He received a 10-year sentence for aggravated possession of child pornography.

Hester’s sentences will run consecutively.

Hester has been incarcerated since his arrest in October after law enforcement received a report he attempted to sexually assault two children at his business, The Computer Helper, located on South Witte in Poteau. During the investigation, officers discovered multiple pieces of child pornography.

A report from the state crime lab stated several of the devices seized from Hester’s business contained child pornography. According to the report, there were 2,453 images of child pornography found on multiple external hard drives and 31 child pornography videos found.

The images and videos located were of pre-pubescent females, both clothed and unclothed in provocative poses and performing provocative dances and movements. Some depicted actual sexual acts.

A digital camera also seized from Hester’s business contained a photo of one of the victims who had made the allegations against him. The victim told police Hester had taken the photo and had tried to photograph her friend as well. Additional pictures of young girls were found on a seized mp4.

Hester had entered a blind plea in court because he believed if he stood trial, the chances of being found guilty were high and it was in his best interest to plead, according to court documents. In a blind plea, there is no such arrangement between prosecutors and the defense, and it is up to the judge to determine sentencing.