Voters could decide whether to split California into three smaller states

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SAN FRANCISCO — California voters could soon be asked to decide whether their state is too big. Tim Draper, who pushed for a six-state proposal, now has a three-state proposal, according to CBS San Francisco.

Draper did not have enough signatures to get his six-state measure on the California ballot in 2016. For this new proposal, he needs 366,000 signatures. On Thursday, he announced that he has more than 600,000 signatures.

“I’m proud to announce we’ve collected more than enough signatures to qualify for the 2018 ballot,” Draper said.

If the proposal passes, the Bay Area, along with counties north of Merced, would be considered as Northern California. Along the coast, from Monterey to Los Angeles, would be California and the counties to the east would be Southern California.

The population of each new state would range from 13.9 million people in Southern California, 13.3 million in Northern California and 12.3 million in California. The three new states would still be among the top ten most populous in the country.

“This would make sure everyone has a government that is responsive and responsible,” Draper said.

But the devil is in the details, and there are a lot of details.

SAN FRANCISCO — California voters could soon be asked to decide whether their state is too big. Tim Draper, who pushed for a six-state proposal, now has a three-state proposal, according to CBS San Francisco.

Draper did not have enough signatures to get his six-state measure on the California ballot in 2016. For this new proposal, he needs 366,000 signatures. On Thursday, he announced that he has more than 600,000 signatures.

“I’m proud to announce we’ve collected more than enough signatures to qualify for the 2018 ballot,” Draper said.

If the proposal passes, the Bay Area, along with counties north of Merced, would be considered as Northern California. Along the coast, from Monterey to Los Angeles, would be California and the counties to the east would be Southern California.

The population of each new state would range from 13.9 million people in Southern California, 13.3 million in Northern California and 12.3 million in California. The three new states would still be among the top ten most populous in the country.

“This would make sure everyone has a government that is responsive and responsible,” Draper said.

But the devil is in the details, and there are a lot of details.

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